: Animal welfare

City of Berkeley bans the sales of fur

BERKELY, UNITED STATES, 10 APRIL 2017 – The City Council of Berkeley CA last week voted to adopt an ordinance banning the sale of fur apparel, signaling that Berkeley is a city that cares about all individuals. The bill was spearheaded by Berkeley Coalition for Animals (BCA), and sponsored by Council Member Kriss Worthington.

BCA is an all-volunteer group that promotes animal-friendly legislation and businesses. Members point out that, historically, Berkeley has recognized and protected the rights of marginalized populations well ahead of other municipalities. Animal advocates want the City to refuse to participate in the exploitation and slaughter of animals. Amy Halpern-Laff, a founding member of the Berkeley Coalition for Animals, says:

“To protect these innocent animals, we need to curtail the demand for their fur. Today, Berkeley took an important step in that direction. We applaud the Council’s leadership in helping to end this cruel industry.”

Berkeley is the second city in the nation to prohibit fur sales. West Hollywood, CA passed a similar ban in 2013. The WeHo ban survived a judicial challenge from several luxury retailers.

fur sales ban Berkely

Earlier this month, over 100 animal advocates marched through Berkeley and staged a rally at the University of California’s Sproul Plaza in support of the fur ban. The march and rally were organized by Direct Action Everywhere, a global grassroots network of animal rights activists.

The version of the Ordinance approved by the City Council contains a few exemptions, which BCA and Council Members are working to eliminate on the second reading tonight.

Read more about bans on fur trade and fur farming HERE.

New bill to ban fur farming in Estonia

ESTONIA, 6 MARCH 2017 – In February a legislative draft to ban fur farming in Estonia was proposed by member of parliament Barbi Pilvre (Social Democrats) . The proposed ban includes a ten-year changeover period for fur farmers to transition to a more sustainable industry.

The draft that was initiated by 14 parliament members from different factions (SDE, REF, KE) would end fur farming in Estonia by 1 January 2028.

According to Pilvre, the 10-year phase-out period offers sufficient time for the less than hundred people currently employed by the industry to retrain for a new profession and find other jobs.

Wild mink

In Estonia there are four mink and fox farms and about 27 chinchilla farms. A total of 200 000 animals are killed annually. 

According to the latest public opinion survey by Kantar Emor, 69% of the Estonian people do not support raising and killing animals on farms for fur.

Estonian population against fur farming

ESTONIA, 5 FEBRUARY 2017 –  69% of the Estonian population does not support raising and killing animals on farms for fur and 75% of the Estonians disapprove of the use of animals in circuses, as was found in the latest survey by Kantar Emor.

According to the survey, that was commissioned by the animal advocacy organization NGO Loomus, 81% of women and 55% of men disapprove of raising and killing animals on farms for fur. 82% of women and 67% of men disapprove of the use of wild animals in circuses. 69% of Estonians and Russians disapprove of raising and killing animals on farms for fur. 83% of Estonians and 58% of Russians disapprove of the use of wild animals in circuses. Kadri Taperson, the manager of Loomus, says:

“Estonian residents’ support for ending animal exploitation in circuses and on fur farms is growing year by year. In comparison to the survey conducted a couple of years ago, the number of people who disapprove of fur farms has grown by 11%. In March 2014, 43% of the people in Estonia thought that wild animals should not be used in circus acts. So, the number of these people has grown by as much as 32% in two and a half years,”

854 People aged 15-74 years participated in the national omnibus survey conducted in December 2016 by Kantar Emor.

Public opinion polls in Europe show high percentages of the population that consider raising and killing of animals for fur unacceptable:

Public Opinion map

Read more about the public opinion against fur farming.

 

Fur sales ban in Israel back on the agenda

ISRAEL, 3 FEBRUARY 2017 – Next Monday, the Ministerial Law Committee is due to discuss a bill that would ban the sale of fur and fur products in Israel. The proposed law imposes a six-month sentence or monetary fine to anyone who sells fur or fur products. The bill exempts the shtreimel – the fur hat worn by Hasidim on Shabbat and Jewish holidays – and all other fur products “that are used for religious needs or religious tradition”.

Israel ban on fur sales

Previous attempts to advance similar legislation that did not make such exemptions failed due to opposition from the ultra-Orthodox factions. To avoid objections from the ultra-Orthodox parties, the shtreimal is not included in the new ban proposal.

At the same time, the bill would permit the use of fur products from cattle, sheep and camels, and the use of fur for scientific research. The bill has garnered the signatures of 25 more MKs from coalition and opposition alike. The bill’s sponsor, Zionist Union MK Merav Michaeli says:

“The days are gone when people didn’t understand that animals suffer too and that humans have an obligation to protect helpless creatures that cannot defend themselves. Cruelty to animals was prohibited in the Torah, and the time has come now for Israeli law to ban the sale of fur. Skinning animals in order to sell their fur is one of the cruelest, most horrible ways to kill animals. Today there are all kinds of synthetic fur available, and there is no reason for us to continue putting animals through such agony.”

The explanatory material for the bill says that each year hundreds of millions of animals are executed by the fur industry:

“The fur industry entails indescribable cruelty and suffering for animals, which are bred in inhumane conditions, brutally captured in the wild, and killed. Often, animals are stripped of their fur while still alive. … Fur is mainly used in the fashion industry. In a warm climate like Israel’s, fur is mainly purchased not out of need but as a status symbol. In the 21st century, there are synthetic fabrics that are warmer than fur.”

If Israel passed the law, it will become the first country in the world to ban the trading of fur. The city of West-Hollywood decided to ban the sales of fur in 2011, and a similar ban was passed in the Brazilian state of Sao Paolo in 2015. In January this year India decided to ban the import of fur.

 

Polish zoo opens sanctuary for injured foxes from fur farms

POLAND, 17 JANUARY 2017 – Cyryl and Ferdinand, the two injured foxes that were rescued from Polish fur farms, are settling in their new sanctuary in the Poznan Zoo. Last year November the zoo, in cooperation with Polish Fur Free Alliance member Otwarte Klatki (Open Cages), opened a new outside enclosure for the two foxes to recover from their injuries caused by the battery cage system on fur farms.

During an inspection the foxes were found to suffer from severe injuries and hospitalized immediately. Cyryl was in such a bad shape that his front paw needed to be amputated while Ferdynand suffered a serious skin disease.

Due to a successful fundraising action by Otwarte Klatki, the finances were raised to build an outside enclosure for the foxes. The official opening event took place on Zwierzyniecka Street in Poznań (the Old Zoo area), in the presence of the vice-president of Poznań, Tomasz Lewandowski, some members of the Poznań Town Council, the actor Michał Piróg and the Canadian photographer and activist, Jo-Anne McArthur.

The visitors could not only see two animals being brought to live in their natural surroundings, but also watch the play by Kornelia Lech, the actress of the Polish Dance Theatre (Fur Means Life Skinning) in the Grot and a photo exhibition from the Polish fur farms.

Cyryl and Ferdynand are not the first foxes that were injured so severely on Polish fur farms that they needed to be hospitalized. In 2015 two small fox cubs were rescued from a fur farm when an inspector observed the cubs were both missing limbs. Missing limbs from biting accidents and infected wounds are found to occur on a large scale on fur farms. The battery cage environment on fur farms is causing foxes numerous stress-related health problemsAnimals kept for fur are mainly active predators and inherently unsuitable for farming conditions.


Poznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farmsPoznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farms Poznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farms Poznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farms
Poznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farms
Poznan zoo adopt rescued foxes from fur farms

India bans the import of mink, fox and chinchilla fur

INDIA, 6 JANUARY 2017 – The Director General of Foreign Trade in India, which comes under the Union Ministry of Commerce and Industry, has banned the import of skins of reptiles, chinchillas, mink and fox through a notification issued on 3 January. 

According to Fur Free Alliance member Humane Society International (HSI), “Worldwide millions of minks and foxes are kept in filthy and wire-floored cages until they are gassed and finally slaughtered for their fur.” The methods used in fur factory farms across the world are remarkably poor and designed to maximize profits, always at the expense of the animals.

Wild Fox

Photo: VILIUS PAŠKEVIČIUS

At present, India’s import policy allows import of “raw hides, skins, leather, fur skins” of reptiles, mink, fox and other fur skins (whole, with or without head, tail or paws). But they are subject to India’s Wild Life (Protection) act, 1972 and CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora).

CITES is an international agreement between governments and it aims to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival.

Animal rights organisations had been urging the central government to take a clear stand on the issue and close the doors for trade in exotic skins. Union women and child development minister Maneka Sanjay Gandhi had earlier written a letter to the Union commerce and industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman highlighting the need to curb cruelty towards animals by prohibiting the import of exotic skins.

The Ministry of Environment and Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC ) and Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI), India’s nodal body for animal welfare, also supported the need to bring in the ban.

“We commend the Directorate General of Foreign Trade and MoEFCC for its firm commitment in abolishing the import of exotic skins. The exotic fur, skin and leather industry slaughters, bludgeons and skins millions of animals every year in the name of frivolous fashion. Nations across the world are switching to cruelty-free alternatives and we are glad that India is gradually emulating similar policies to reduce and eliminate unnecessary pain and suffering to animals,” said Gauri Maulekhi, who is HSI India’s government liaison.